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Go Back   Madabout Kitcars Forum > Mad Build Area > Vintage and Classic Roadster Kit Car Builds

Vintage and Classic Roadster Kit Car Builds For Vintage and Classic era kit cars. Post your build reports, problems and progress here

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  #121  
Old 13th June 2020, 06:44
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Aah, thanks Paul, that's a better picture of the head fairing so you can see what I mean about the 'horns' at the sides. You can also clearly see how far back the cover sits to allow space for the driver and passenger.

I didn't twig that it was a replica when it was on screen, but it doesn't get much (enough) screen time or any close-ups as I recall.

Up close and static it gives itself away in a few seconds, though - it doesn't have a rear engine cover, just a flat grille from a coupe set directly into the back which is a one-piece moulding -



Also, those steel(?) wheels with spinners look just like Rudge alloys (an original option on the 356, see below) from a distance, but the four-bolt pattern shouts 'kit car' to anyone who knows their 356's as soon as you see it.





Images sourced here - https://borderreivers.co/portfolio/p...peedster-1957/

Having said all that, I wouldn't turn it down if the studio rang and offered it to me as a gift...

Last edited by Mister Towed; 13th June 2020 at 06:49.. Reason: add pics
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  #122  
Old 16th June 2020, 07:07
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I've made some positive progress over the weekend without any serious setbacks.

I finished off taping up my head fairing. It's only going to be a 'close enough' shape to work on out of the mould, hence the plug being somewhat basic -



Off the car to reinforce the lower edge it is very reminiscent of one end of a Viking longship, fit for a trip to Valhalla -



Back on the car I covered it with half a dozen layers of 500gsm CSM -



Leaving me with a basic mould for the head fairing -



The mould needs a little work on the inside: a bit of filler here and there, sanding smooth and painting, but it'll do the job once that's done.

Speaking of which, after a week or so for the paint to cure, I also set my hybrid 356/550 dashboard mould to work over the weekend.

As it's a two-piece mould with a pretty complex shape for the eyebrow over the instrument cluster it's definitely the most ambitious fibreglass item I've ever tried to fabricate.

Here's the mould clamped together after multiple coats of release wax had been applied -



Next job was to put PVA release agent on top of the wax. This is where I did have a bit of a problem, though: Following the manufacturer's guidance, I sprayed the PVA into the mould using a conventional gun with a 2.2 nozzle, but rather than a smooth, thin coat, the PVA just beaded on the surface, even though the first few coats were just a dusting. Googling it, I found that some release waxes cause this and some don't, and I was just unlucky enough to be using one that does.

I couldn't find any posts that said what to do about it, I figured I could wash it off and just go with the wax but didn't want the dash to stick in the mould, which could be a disaster.

Instead I took a 1" paintbrush and kept brushing the liquid out across the inside of the mould as it beaded until it started to set and stopped beading. That left a rather uneven coat of PVA on the mould, but I figured it was as good as it was going to get so I went ahead with the next steps.

After leaving the PVA to fully dry overnight, I gave the mould a couple of fairly thick coats of white gelcoat, brushed on as I don't have any thinners compatible with it for spraying (and it's the consistency of treacle out of the tin).

Once that went tacky, I used a layer of 30gsm 'surface tissue' making sure it was smoothed as far as possible onto the gelcoat. Then it was on with the resin and layers of 200 and 300gsm CSM to build up the dash in the mould.

As the dash eyebrow is quite intricate and impossible to get a roller into, I found it was best to fully stuff it with the lighter weight CSM and resin, ramming it home with the tip of a paintbrush to make sure there were no voids and that the eyebrow will actually be solid fibreglass.

Anyway, after leaving it for 24 hours to cure, the time came to see what I'd achieved.

Drum roll, please...

So far so good, the front part of the mould came off with some serious screwdriver prying -



Then the back of the mould followed suit, leaving a newborn dash moulding, complete with PVA placenta!



And after a wash with warm water and as sponge -



I was in tears (of joy) even if my new baby wasn't.

Okay, it's not up to pro standard, it needs quite a bit of work to make perfect - the gelcoat surface is quite pitted from where the PVA had gone on lumpy and there's a heavy moulding seam to sand out, but it's light, strong and the shape I want, so I'm over the moon!

Here it is dropped into the shell (prior to trimming) -





More later
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  #123  
Old 16th June 2020, 08:06
oxford1360 oxford1360 is offline
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Well done that man. Looks great.
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  #124  
Old 16th June 2020, 08:18
Mitchelkitman Mitchelkitman is offline
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Was there wax on the mould before the PVA was added? I've tried to use PVA in the past, and found it beeded, also when I tried to get my object out that it was stuck fast in the mould! I gave up using PVA, and just rely on wax. Last year a made a mould, and a week later waxed it many times (no PVA) and a part got stuck permanently in the mould. I then read on the 'net that GRP that isn't fully cured can still cross-link with more GRP even with a release agent separating them - that seems plausible, because I then made a new mould and let it cure for 2 weeks, did a couple of wax coats, and subsequently laid up a part with popped out with hardly any effort. I was making a very small plug for a part a few days ago and couldn't get a great finish on it, and decided I'd put some PVA on it to achieve the smooth finish..... As I was putting it on by brush I couldn't get it smooth anyway, so thinned it with water, which meant i achieved a smooth finish. but interestingly when it dried it appeared a lot thinner! We'll see what happens. BTW It was the same PVA as I'd used before, but no wax on the plug, and the PVA didn't beed.
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  #125  
Old 16th June 2020, 13:30
molleur molleur is offline
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Ideally, PVA should be applied by spraying at least three "fog" (very thin) coats allowing it to fully dry between each. This will go over mould release wax, 5 layers on a new buck or mould. allowed to dry at least 15 minuted between coats and buffed. Never had an issue using this method for 25 years.
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  #126  
Old 18th June 2020, 05:37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Towed View Post
...Okay, it's not up to pro standard, it needs quite a bit of work to make perfect - the gelcoat surface is quite pitted from where the PVA had gone on lumpy and there's a heavy moulding seam to sand out, but it's light, strong and the shape I want, so I'm over the moon!..
And over the moon you should be.

For a first attempt at a two piece mould, I wouldn't be comparing yourself to Chris @ Tribute who does this sort of thing with his eyes closed.

The key point, for me, is that you have a lightweight custom build fibreglass part.

Whereas, I'm actually driving around in the 'buck' for my car.

Good luck, Paul.
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  #127  
Old 18th June 2020, 07:31
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Thanks for your input regarding the PVA and wax release agents, guys, and before I take any more mouldings I'll be testing different techniques out before using it on the mould.

And thanks for your kind words Oxford and Paul. If you'd told me ten years ago that I would be fabricating such a complex part in fibreglass and achieving the result I have I'd have thought it impossible.

But then I searched 'Spyder' on ebay hoping to find a 718 RSK project or abandoned kit, but came across Gary Jaynes' Sammio project instead.

Since then I've learned skills like welding, making my own moulds for complex fibreglass parts and spray painting to a standard that looks quite satisfactory. Well, satisfactory enough for a serious car collector to fall in love with one of my cars and display it amongst his selection of classic Ferrari's, anyway.



So, next step is to bond the new dash into the body, blend a fibreglass bulkhead I have managed to acquire into the body and dash, then fabricate and bond in a complete floor in fibreglass to pull it all together and give the body the strength it needs.

That sounds like it shouldn't take long...
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  #128  
Old 19th June 2020, 17:21
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Just had time for a trial fit of the dash and bonnet onto the main shell this afternoon, and it looks like it's all going to fit together quite nicely -





And with the aeroscreen in place you get an idea of how it's going to look and the view the driver will have -





Should be a bit more progress to report over the weekend.
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  #129  
Old 19th June 2020, 17:45
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Forgot to mention that I am going to be able to use the floor mounted pedal box I have on the shelf which I thought might end up too close to the driver but will actually be fine -

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  #130  
Old 20th June 2020, 08:56
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Looking good with great progress. It is interesting seeing this project coming together and look forward to further updates.
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  #131  
Old 21st June 2020, 06:25
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Mr T - I'd not spotted how the dash was going to join the bodyshell before, it will be a very neat job when finished.

Good luck, Paul.
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  #132  
Old 21st June 2020, 18:22
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Thanks for your input Froggyman, glad you like what you see.

Yes, Paul, that picture does quite nicely show how the dash will blend in to the 356's structure both at the top and down the sides of the inner bodyshell.

Over the weekend I started the process of mating the dash, bodyshell, bulkhead and bonnet by adding a lip to the dash for the bonnet to sit on.

I started by attaching the dash and bonnet together with strips of aluminium and screws so the leading edge of the dash and trailing edge of the bonnet were level.

Next step was to make a cardboard 'mould' (covered with parcel tape to stop it sticking) in-situ, both to form the lip and to give a 5mm gap for a seal between them to be added later.

I then gave the mould a coat of gelcoat and followed that up with three layers of heavy duty csm -





Next morning I split the bonnet and dash and ripped off the cardboard mould to reveal this -



Dropped in place with the bulkhead attached roughly where it's going to be and it looks like this -





...and with the main and inner bonnets fitted -







I'm happy with progress so far. It's clear that once the bonnet has a seal to bring it level with the opening it'll fit over the engine without fouling anything and everything lines up nicely.

Next step is to put some effort into smoothing the surface of the dash both inside and out with it off the car, then bond and glass the dash and bulkhead into the body.

More later
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  #133  
Old 25th June 2020, 06:30
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I have now fabricated the upper bulkhead to link the dash to the lower bulkhead using high-tech cardboard aided design -





It's coming along quite nicely considering I'm making it up as I go along, and it looks like it will be a pretty rigid structure once it's all glassed together.
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  #134  
Old 25th June 2020, 16:45
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D'Oh!

I'd forgotten you are making the whole bonnet flip up.

Now, the dash work makes even more sense.

Good luck, Paul.
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  #135  
Old 28th June 2020, 17:24
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Fabricated some brackets to take the Honda Civic alloy radiator this afternoon and it all fits quite nicely -











The space around the radiator is a luxury I didn't have in my Spyder as the straight six was mounted much further forward than this four pot motor. At least that means a lot less likelihood of grazed knuckles if the radiator ever has to come out!

Despite looking a bit tight height-wise, there's actually about two inches clearance from the top of the radiator cap to the underside of the bonnet.

To keep as much air as possible flowing through the radiator I'll be making aluminium side boards similar to a Spitfire's to seal the sides, and an aluminium undertray with a discrete scoop built into it will pull air from underneath the front and from the two MGF vents in the front valance. That and the electric fan should keep it all cool.
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  #136  
Old 28th June 2020, 17:46
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its taking shape well and everything looks a good fit. The engine looks small and has room looking at mine today I said that's a small gap for a big engine. You can never tell from pictures the chassis look big in reality we put it in the back of a transit with the wheels still on. stay one step a head on the mechanics so I no what to do next. lol
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  #137  
Old 28th June 2020, 18:11
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...I could stay one step ahead if you slow down a bit. Perhaps your fishing trip will give me time to progress mine a bit further.

One thought on how yours is progressing. I noted that your headlight buckets foul the ends of the front 'crash bar'. On mine they're sitting well below the headlight openings, just above the front valance cooling vents. As I've set my body to put the wheels at the correct height in the arches, that might suggest that your body is going to be lower than it needs to be. I'm all for the slammed look, but you've got to get an engine in there somewhere.
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  #138  
Old 28th June 2020, 19:16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Towed View Post
...I could stay one step ahead if you slow down a bit. Perhaps your fishing trip will give me time to progress mine a bit further.

One thought on how yours is progressing. I noted that your headlight buckets foul the ends of the front 'crash bar'. On mine they're sitting well below the headlight openings, just above the front valance cooling vents. As I've set my body to put the wheels at the correct height in the arches, that might suggest that your body is going to be lower than it needs to be. I'm all for the slammed look, but you've got to get an engine in there somewhere.
thanks for the tip, they do foul by about 10mm just enough to hold the bucket out. slammed it is then lol. I will get some tiers on the wheels the body dose sit low but I was more thinking by the time its got 15" wheels on it will ride about the right height to the ground. wheels should clear as they are set in a bit more. only time will tell I will order some more cutting disc just in case I need to make some mods.
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  #139  
Old 8th July 2020, 10:45
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it's coming together!!
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  #140  
Old 9th July 2020, 06:36
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Thanks Car Photographer, progress is indeed rumbling along slowly.

What I've been doing for the last week or so isn't very photogenic, I'm afraid, hence no pictorial updates for a while.

I currently have the body off the chassis and I'm reinforcing areas of the shell that are too thin or where different mouldings need permanently joining.

These include the rear 'seat'/luggage area which is only a couple of thin layers of CSM making it flexible and fragile, and the sills under the doors which are a two part moulding that I'd bonded together but needed another 10mm of CSM & core-mat to keep the door openings rigid and raise the body up a fraction on the sub-frame.

While the body's off and upside down I'm also fabricating the mechanism for the fuel filler flap and spillage tray under the rear deck.

Should get some pictures of visible progress by the weekend.
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