Are you madabout kit cars      
 "We've Got Kit Cars Covered" Information about Madabout-Kitcars.com Contact Madabout-Kitcars.com         Home of UK kit cars - madabout-kitcars.com Various kit car write ups All the latest kit car news Kit car related and general discussion

Search
Manufacturers
Kit Cars
Kit Car Data sheets
Picture Gallery
SVA Knowledgebase
Clubs & Communities
Build cost estimator
Kit cars for sale
Knowledge Base 
KitcarUSA.com
Classic-Kitcars.com
 

Go Back   Madabout Kitcars Forum > Mad Build Area > Tribute Automotive Builds

Tribute Automotive Builds Discuss your Tribute kit build

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #81  
Old 19th May 2016, 20:48
Jaguartvr's Avatar
Jaguartvr Jaguartvr is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Egham, Surrey
Posts: 1,640
Jaguartvr is on a distinguished road
Default

Don't bother, you will only fill it up with crap.
I started with a single garage and over the years it has ended up 4 cars long but a single width. I still can't get a bloody car in because of all my "valuable" rubbish. Trouble is as soon as I have a clear out, the things I have just got rid of I suddenly need.
Reply With Quote
  #82  
Old 19th May 2016, 21:05
306craig 306craig is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 272
306craig is on a distinguished road
Default

LOL. I know exactly what you mean, there is a 'spare' washing machine, fridge (my beer fridge), freezer (the 'BBQ Freezer' full of reduced price meat) and a builders bag full of firewood (just getting ready for next winter)!!!!! in my garage.

4 cars long - that is either 4 very short cars, or a very long drive / garden!!!!

Last edited by 306craig; 19th May 2016 at 23:16..
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old 19th May 2016, 22:11
Barber's Avatar
Barber Barber is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Camberley
Posts: 944
Barber is on a distinguished road
Default

We just moved out of our house after 25 years. It took longer to sort out the garage than either the attic or the house.
Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old 21st May 2016, 12:17
Jaguartvr's Avatar
Jaguartvr Jaguartvr is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Egham, Surrey
Posts: 1,640
Jaguartvr is on a distinguished road
Default

I've been here for 21 years, I still have 2 tea chests full of "Valuble" tools in the shed unpacked. I know if I throw them away I will need them next week.
Reply With Quote
  #85  
Old 25th May 2016, 06:23
Paul L's Avatar
Paul L Paul L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wembley, London
Posts: 4,805
Paul L is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaguartvr View Post
… I think if you do do the 7mm cut it could well cause stress fractures or cracks in the outer skin. If I do resort to cutting a slot to massage the lower edge in I will do I think 3 separate slots to spread out any stress. I also think that just one large cut could also result in a feelable (if that makes sense) line in the outer panel. This would probably show after it was painted…
Jag - Sorry I meant to reply to this earlier, but forgot.

However, seeing you mention it again on the "SWB Crack" thread reminded me.

From my limited fibreglass experience, the key to a good join seems to be tackling it from both sides.

Here is an example of my Before, During & After work on one of my wheel arches.







There is no "feelable" line in any part of the wheel arch above.

And here is some more detail of the process I used taken from a different arch…

The inside of all the joins are covered in fibreglass matting.



Then the outside of the joins are ground out to be much wider, in a very rough "V" shape.



So that when extra matting is added on the outside, they cover the both sides of the original fibreglass and the join.



The arch above, is still work in progress and more matting needs to be added.

But by the time a layer of fibreglass filler and then "normal" filler are added, the joint should be "as good as new". < Touch Wood >

Hope that helps, Paul.

Last edited by Paul L; 26th May 2016 at 06:41.. Reason: Making it clear fibreglass filler is used before normal filler
Reply With Quote
  #86  
Old 26th May 2016, 12:34
trev dunn trev dunn is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 56
trev dunn is on a distinguished road
Default

just back off hols and noticed the new thread,well done, lots of interesting info. glad the up-rated struts were a success, we spoke about them at Stoneliegh when you showed me the trims. I was going to do the one cut to bring the bonnet in line but have now decided to go the multi cut route.The car is currently at my mates body shop he had a spare bay so much better then working in my single garage) what we have noticed is that the doors cant be opened to the 2nd door stop when the bonnet is in the down position, we positioned the door to its optimum position then removed the metal check strap form the a post, cut a section out and welded it to make it shorter so the door wont catch the bonnet. Looking at your pics I always had a soft spot for the Mitsu GTO I ran one for a few years and often wondered if any one had done a body kit conversion for them. I must try to post some pics (not good on pc will have to consult a younger member of the family) keep up the good work. Trev
Reply With Quote
  #87  
Old 26th May 2016, 13:22
Jaguartvr's Avatar
Jaguartvr Jaguartvr is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Egham, Surrey
Posts: 1,640
Jaguartvr is on a distinguished road
Default

I have a cunning plan on the door opening problem, watch this space! Hopefully will have the time to have a play over the weekend.
Reply With Quote
  #88  
Old 28th May 2016, 16:40
Jaguartvr's Avatar
Jaguartvr Jaguartvr is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Egham, Surrey
Posts: 1,640
Jaguartvr is on a distinguished road
Default

The bonnet cut.

The bonnet sits about 1cm proud of the sill at the bottom edge. I wanted to avoid the 7cm cut method as I thought it might cause too much stress on the bonnet.
I tuned the bonnet upside down and measured across, 1695mm at the rear and 1680mm at the front. Cut two slots on each side of the bonnet with a 2mm cutting disc. Don't plunge too deeply or you will catch the vent on the other side. Take the slot right to the ends.
Then put a ratchet strap on it to curve the bottom inwards, just a little pressure takes it in a long way,I was surprised how much. Release some tension and measured across again, tried 1670 at the front and 1680 at the rear, simply because this is what it came too with a little tension. Attach some builders band across the slots front and rear with self tappers.
Trial fit and adjust the bands if necessary, I was lucky, it was just about perfect, I thought if I tried to improve it I would only make it worse. If you look closely at the gaps you will see that I have had to close them up only slightly, next time I would start with a 1mm cutting disc.
Apply some CSM between the builders bands

Let it dry and remove the builders bands and apply more CSM to the gaps.
I find 4 pint milk bottles ideal for mixing the resin, use disposable brushes and use the last brush used which will have gone hard for mixing the resin.

Gloves are for pansies!
Refit the bonnet and check the line, you can fine tune the fit by putting pressure at the hinge when tightening the fixing nuts.

Almost perfection if I must say so myself.

Last edited by Jaguartvr; 28th May 2016 at 16:43..
Reply With Quote
  #89  
Old 28th May 2016, 18:00
molleur molleur is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 1,203
molleur is on a distinguished road
Default

Well done!
Reply With Quote
  #90  
Old 28th May 2016, 22:18
froggyman's Avatar
froggyman froggyman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Devon
Posts: 523
froggyman is on a distinguished road
Default

Nice one. This is what the forum is all about!
Reply With Quote
  #91  
Old 28th May 2016, 22:21
Mikewade Mikewade is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Lincolnshire
Posts: 85
Mikewade is on a distinguished road
Default

Thanks for posting. Good photo's and description!
Reply With Quote
  #92  
Old 29th May 2016, 00:05
Lucky@LeMans Lucky@LeMans is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,321
Lucky@LeMans is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaguartvr View Post
The bonnet cut.

The bonnet sits about 1cm proud of the sill at the bottom edge. I wanted to avoid the 7cm cut method as I thought it might cause too much stress on the bonnet.
I tuned the bonnet upside down and measured across, 1695mm at the rear and 1680mm at the front. Cut two slots on each side of the bonnet with a 2mm cutting disc. Don't plunge too deeply or you will catch the vent on the other side. Take the slot right to the ends.
Then put a ratchet strap on it to curve the bottom inwards, just a little pressure takes it in a long way,I was surprised how much. Release some tension and measured across again, tried 1670 at the front and 1680 at the rear, simply because this is what it came too with a little tension. Attach some builders band across the slots front and rear with self tappers.
Trial fit and adjust the bands if necessary, I was lucky, it was just about perfect, I thought if I tried to improve it I would only make it worse. If you look closely at the gaps you will see that I have had to close them up only slightly, next time I would start with a 1mm cutting disc.
Apply some CSM between the builders bands

Let it dry and remove the builders bands and apply more CSM to the gaps.
I find 4 pint milk bottles ideal for mixing the resin, use disposable brushes and use the last brush used which will have gone hard for mixing the resin.

Gloves are for pansies!
Refit the bonnet and check the line, you can fine tune the fit by putting pressure at the hinge when tightening the fixing nuts.

Almost perfection if I must say so myself.
Good job but its a shame you have to do this on a 5k panel kit. Tribute should really get the mold sorted out for future kits.
Reply With Quote
  #93  
Old 29th May 2016, 00:19
Jaguartvr's Avatar
Jaguartvr Jaguartvr is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Egham, Surrey
Posts: 1,640
Jaguartvr is on a distinguished road
Default

Small adjustment, took about an hour, this is the cheaper convertible kit. No complaints so far.
Reply With Quote
  #94  
Old 29th May 2016, 07:05
Paul L's Avatar
Paul L Paul L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wembley, London
Posts: 4,805
Paul L is on a distinguished road
Default

Jag - Thanks for showing us how you did it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaguartvr View Post
Take the slot right to the ends
Can I just check if those slots go all the way through to the "sunny side" of the bonnet, or do they only cut the inner panel?

As I must confess I got the impression you needed to cut off & reattach a section of the bonnet to make it fit.

Hence the example I gave above of working on both sides of the join for extra strength and no visible joint.
( Happy to edit/remove that post if it is not relevant to the fix required. )

Good luck, Paul.

PS
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaguartvr View Post
Gloves are for pansies!
Guess I'm a pansy then.
Reply With Quote
  #95  
Old 29th May 2016, 08:28
Jaguartvr's Avatar
Jaguartvr Jaguartvr is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Egham, Surrey
Posts: 1,640
Jaguartvr is on a distinguished road
Default

It is simply slots in the inner skin only although you need to slot the returns to allow it to bend.
It feels a very solid panel, I was surprised how much it came in with the ratchet strap.
Before you start measure how much the bottom edge of the bonnet stick out past the sill, I had about 15mm. I pulled it in 25mm at the back and 30mm at the front simply because this was where my first tensioning of the ratchet strap brought me to and I was just intending to use it as a first reference point expecting to have to tighten or losen the builders bands before glassing the slots up.
As I got it right on the first attempt it makes me a genius......or it could be down to luck, but I prefer genius!

It is most important to measure across the bonnet at the front and rear where it meets the sill to give you a reference point.

Last edited by Jaguartvr; 29th May 2016 at 16:40..
Reply With Quote
  #96  
Old 29th May 2016, 08:50
Jaguartvr's Avatar
Jaguartvr Jaguartvr is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Egham, Surrey
Posts: 1,640
Jaguartvr is on a distinguished road
Default Door Handles

Looking at Eric's pictures I decided to try and cheat.
With the door skin attached with a couple of self tappers I drilled through the GRP and steel skin together. I simply guessed at the centre of the hole using the mark on the door. The mark on the door is just where Chris has obviously filled in the hole where he had fitted the door handle and roughly filled it.



I then pushed the drill bit had and the door popped open

I did the same on the passenger door but this time it didn't pop open, never mind.

I then removed the skin and used a 40mm hole saw.


You can see where the drill bit hit the opening bar, you just push the bar to open the door. I now just have to fit a small metal plate as per Eric's guide.
If you were to guess the centre of the hole on the GRP skin and there lower it 5mm I think it may well hit the centre of the door push and you might get away without fitting the plate.
When enlarging the hole with the hole saw you will find there are two layers of metal at the top, drill and remove both, the second layer is something to do with the lock and can be removed.

I intend to glue a larger diameter slice of plastic pipe above the new hole, this is to deflect any water running down the original door skin and entering the hole.
I was quite surprised at how much water had collected in the bottom of the new GRP skin, lots of drainage holes will be needed.

Use the small drill hole in the outer GRP skin as the point where the door handle push goes through. Use the gasket supplied with the door handle as a template.
On my door handles I cut off the door locking lever, it is not needed and means you can keep the hole in the door smaller. You can dismantle the handle but I cut it off with tin snips, that way I did not have to remove the push on fixing, they never tighten up as well when used again.

For clarification, when you lock or unlock the car using the remote key fob, when locked the new mini door handle will not open the door, use the fob to open and the mini handle will open the door so there is no need to do any extra work on the locks. If your remote fob doesn't work I would suggest you get it working first. If the remote locking breaks after you have fitted the new door skins you are *ucked! Most likely cause for failure is a flat battery so I intend to leave the boot with a manual key lock so I can get to the battery. I also need to try and fit an emergency release cable so I can hopefully open the door in case the remote locking packs up completely, job for a later day.

Last edited by Jaguartvr; 29th May 2016 at 14:03..
Reply With Quote
  #97  
Old 29th May 2016, 09:25
DaveP DaveP is offline
Senior Member
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Reading, Berkshire
Posts: 630
DaveP is on a distinguished road
Default

I really am enjoying your no nonsense approach to these tasks. Simple solutions to simple challenges. Too often we can over- think some things.

Thanks for this thread. It instills confidence

Dave
Reply With Quote
  #98  
Old 29th May 2016, 09:32
Jaguartvr's Avatar
Jaguartvr Jaguartvr is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Egham, Surrey
Posts: 1,640
Jaguartvr is on a distinguished road
Default

Thanks, It has helped by having to wait 6 weeks to have the kit delivered. It allows you to get things ordered and get a plan of action on how to tackle things. I couldn't wait to try my Velcro door cheat and it even worked!
Having read Eric's build so many times gave me so many ideas as he covered it all so well. It's great that everyone is sharing tips.
I did notice someone had a cure for Andy's roof crack, he hasn't shared it, just stated he knows how to cure it, very helpful for the other forum members. I would bear in mind if you decide to go for a "professional" build.
Reply With Quote
  #99  
Old 29th May 2016, 12:17
Barber's Avatar
Barber Barber is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Camberley
Posts: 944
Barber is on a distinguished road
Default

Jag, great work, straightforward plan, execution and description. Just the kind of thing i need.
Reply With Quote
  #100  
Old 29th May 2016, 12:40
Lucky@LeMans Lucky@LeMans is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,321
Lucky@LeMans is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaguartvr View Post
Thanks, It has helped by having to wait 6 weeks to have the kit delivered. It allows you to get things ordered and get a plan of action on how to tackle things. I couldn't wait to try my Velcro door cheat and it even worked!
Having read Eric's build so many times gave me so many ideas as he covered it all so well. It's great that everyone is sharing tips.
I did notice someone had a cure for Andy's roof crack, he hasn't shared it, just stated he knows how to cure it, very helpful for the other forum members. I would bear in mind if you decide to go for a "professional" build.
I think Nubodi mentioned something , perhaps send them a pm.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +0. The time now is 09:00.

copyright madabout-kitcars.com 2000-2019
terms and conditions | privacy policy