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Go Back   Madabout Kitcars Forum > Mad Build Area > Seven Style builds

Seven Style builds Westfields, Caterham, Dax Rush, Luego, Robin Hood, Tiger, Locust, MK, RAW, Quantum, you name it, you're building it, share it here.

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  #1  
Old 22nd June 2022, 09:46
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Default Dutton Dementia

Having abandoned and sold (to a top bloke - he drove up from Crediton to Gloucester just to hand over the cash in advance of collection) the scarcely started Marlin Madness project (thread next door). I'm now going to focus on the Phaeton II. I moved it into the now vacated cave a couple of days ago ready to start the action.



First job will be removing the huge flip front with its integral wings and headlamps and sawing off same as I'll be fitting clam shell wings. I'll then remove the rest of the bodywork to facilitate refurbishing the chassis prior to offering up the 'Climax' engine and gearbox. With any luck some more pictures will appear soon .

Regards, Mick
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  #2  
Old 22nd June 2022, 18:46
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Default A bit of a start :)

This morning, flushed with enthusiasm for my new project, I went down to the already scorching cave and pitched in. First job was to remove the huge, and to my eyes ugly, front. It's a beast!



Next, out with the sumptuously upholstered seats .



Then the rear end gubbins.



Followed by the attack of the panel saw - very satisfying - halfway there...



Once the other ghastly bloated front wing/headlamp was excised, I popped on the now svelte bonnet to admire her new open wheeler look.



I stowed all the bits removed in my own shed and called it a day in the blistering heat. A decent start.

Regards, Mick
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  #3  
Old 22nd June 2022, 22:47
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redratbike redratbike is offline
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looks better already

good start
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  #4  
Old 23rd June 2022, 16:39
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Thumbs up Nibbling away

Today I decided to attack the scuttle/dash/steering column/heater area.

I'd removed the windscreen and wipers yesterday and, as the column went through the dash, I attacked it first. Pretty straightforward, but time consuming and fiddly, as the builder had wisely fitted a second support, bolted to the substantial pedal box, for the outer column. This home made bracket included a single bolt attachment for the Mk1 Mini heater which otherwise simply sat on the transmission tunnel. I'd fitted one of these in my first Phaeton, blanking off the passenger side outlets so that all the heat went to my feet, or on start up with the flap closed, to the sole screen demister vent I'd fitted to my side. It worked a treat.

As access to the back of the dash was seriously limited, even when I performed my upside down in the footwell contortions, I next drilled out the scuttle's pop rivets, which gave just enough access to wangle out the heater and disconnect and remove the clocks and switches. The wiper rack fought me for a while but blacksmith methods saw it yield. After stowing these bits away I sat on a cross member in the engine bay and began removing the loom and solenoids, feeding the former back through the bulkhead into the footwell. There seems to be an awful lot of wiring for such a simple car? I'll remove it all carefully, even though I'll be fabricating a replacement a la Monaco from a Spitfire loom I have in the shed. I love wiring! Today's contortions having taken their toll on my ageing body I called it a day.





Regards, Mick
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  #5  
Old 24th June 2022, 16:48
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Default More nibbling...

Time was at a premium today, so I only managed a couple of hours. Starting in the engine bay, I unclipped all the sections of the loom in front of the bulkhead and fed them through to the footwell. Before I could go any further I had to tear out the carpet, not that easy in places where it was attached with King Kong double sided tape . I then attacked the boot area, removing the lamp units etc. I decided to not cut the front to rear portion which runs under the seat bucket, but leave it in place for continuity testing - it might be good for re-use. The builder and/or subsequent owners certainly liked their reel of blue cable and the length of yellow/green domestic for earth!



I'm unsure whether to remove the seat bucket as I could well be making a rod for my own back. I'll have a good crawl about underneath tomorrow before deciding.

Regards, Mick
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  #6  
Old 25th June 2022, 13:20
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MartinClan MartinClan is offline
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Watching with interest as it is bringing back memories of my build over 40 years ago.
As I remember the seat tub was extremely flimsy. You may want to check yours with a possible view to reinforcement!
The other thing etched into my memory, in addition to the poor steering column support, is that the handbrake mechanism on the top of the rear axle used to hit the underside of the boot floor. In the end I just cut a hole and covered it with carpet. Sigh.... those were the days.
Cheers Robin
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  #7  
Old 25th June 2022, 18:26
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Exclamation Aching all over

Quote:
Originally Posted by MartinClan View Post
Watching with interest as it is bringing back memories of my build over 40 years ago.
Cheers Robin
Yes, it's all coming back to me also. It was 40 years ago last month that I hired a dingy trailer and towed it down to Worthing behind my ex Post Office van 'Mini Traveller' with my brother in law riding shotgun. It took me four and a half years to get it on the road, but I did have four children and two cottages to renovate at the time, as well as a 60 mile round trip to Bristle each weekday. Happy Days!

The guy picking up the Marlin was due this morning at 1000 but was over an hour late due to heavy traffic, so the morning was a write off. Good fun loading up, he had a cracking anecdote about a Spartan he went to collect which was crammed with bits and full of water which he couldn't drain. His description of the sloshing activity on the motorway viewed in his mirror was hilarious.



This afternoon I jacked up the near side high enough to worm underneath and spray the prop to axle, handbrake mounting, and seat belt attachment bolts with dismantling liquid. I then removed the high-tech side exhaust mounting bracket (drilled for lightness!) which I'm sure would otherwise sooner or later have scalped me.



Whilst waiting for the penetrating liquid to do its job, I drilled out the seriously overkill number of rivets attaching the seat tub to the frame and gently levered it away from the surrounding body panels. Now, only the handbrake and belt mountings stood in the way of tub removal. Worming back underneath I found the the prop would have to come off for handbrake mounting bolt clearance. The lack of room for leverage on these defeated me, despite profanity and skinned knuckles, so I called it a day, reasonably satisfied with progress. I'm definitely not getting any younger!

Regards, Mick
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  #8  
Old 2nd August 2022, 09:57
Ozzie Dave Ozzie Dave is offline
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Many thanks Mick, I also built a Phaeton(s3) many moons ago, so many memories coming back, I remember looking front on and seeing the front wheels a 2 different cambers, on checking there was almost an inch difference from one top mounting to the other, a chassis rail that had to be cut and moved as the propshaft 'ran through' and seat floorpans and a pedalbox bulkhead that had to be reinforced to stop them buckling and cracking- But it was a great fun car and eventually moved to Germany.
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  #9  
Old 6th August 2022, 18:04
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Default On the level - just!

Four weeks ago - pre internet disaster - I took peterux's advice and invested in an engine leveller, my umpteenth purchase from Machine Mart. Its first job was to hold up the engine/box combo for separation. I believe the gearbox is shared with other heftier Rootes models so, despite having an alloy casing, the leveller was at one extreme before balance was achieved. I had to put a ratchet strap around it from a roof beam for support but my struggles were successful - eventually.



I then craned the engine up to yet another MM purchase, bolted it to same, folded the crane, put the 'box in the shed and turned back to the frame.



That was it for that now far off day.

Regards, Mick
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  #10  
Old 6th August 2022, 18:20
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Default Bye Bye Old Mountings.

Next visit to the repeatedly stifling cave involved kneeling pad, hacksaw, angle grinder, both cutting and grinding discs, and a flapwheel. Cutting one end of the engine mountings from the frame, and using work hardening to break off the other end, resulted in unsightly holes in the frame as the welds proved much stronger than TDW's tubes. Patching will be required.



The gearbox mounting offered little resistance and was off in no time.



I then ground and flapped off the worst of the jagged stubs and called it a day.

Regards, Mick
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  #11  
Old 7th August 2022, 10:30
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Default Wide Steel Wheel Woes

Wanting an Old Skool look, I'd been scanning Ebay for wide steel wheels. I came across an ad. for six Mk1 Escort ones at 100 quid. As soon as I 'watched' them the vendor offered them for 75. Making sure from the pictures that they were 13" (very early Escorts had 12") I bought and paid for them. Having collected them from Aylesbury I ordered five 165 80 13s from my ever helpful supplier, who removed the old rubber so I could refurbish them. One was scrap, one was borderline, so OK for a spare, and four were pretty reasonable, given their age. Countless hours with flap wheels, cup brushes and rust converter had the main four top-coat ready, so I offered one up to check the look. Oops, they're 100E with a 4.5" PCD. My tyre man was ready with my new rubber so I broke the habit of a lifetime, put my hand in my pocket, and bought five new 5.5J ones from John Brown Wheels with free next day delivery and a small but welcome 'end of line' discount. With the new rubber on the Phaeton's value doubled overnight!

Apparently wide 100E steels are a fave of hot rodders so, with luck, I might get my money back!

Regards, Mick
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  #12  
Old 7th August 2022, 15:00
Lucky@LeMans Lucky@LeMans is offline
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Hi Mick,

If you want to save "countless " hours prepping old wheels ready to paint, you can't beat having them shot blasted and powder coated . So many companies are doing it now, I bet there are several in Gloucester.
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  #13  
Old 7th August 2022, 15:07
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Default Sneak Peek



I'll be painting the rims silver and the nave plates in the main body colour, which will be a very dark green. If I can find my source picture I'll post it.

Regards, Mick

Here we go, I'll plump for a darker green, maybe BL Connaught Green, and flare the gold out around the nose .


Last edited by Mick O'Malley; 8th August 2022 at 13:21.. Reason: Oops!
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  #14  
Old 9th August 2022, 19:07
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Talking Bullet Bitten

Today, whilst pondering next steps and waiting for goodies from postie (no luck ), I decided to bite the bullet and remove the rear body. First job was to drill out the ten 4mm pop rivets securing the moulding to the frame. Attempting to lift it off resulted in zero movement - examination beneath revealed blacksmith style tank supports similar to the rear lower seat belt mounting one. To get the necessary access I jacked the back end high enough to get axle stands on their top setting in place, left the jack just touching the diff. and put a ratchet strap under the roll bar and over a roof beam for full belt and braces effect.



After a realistic effort at dislodging it, I felt comfortable with worming underneath armed with my decades old B&D angle grinder. The ends of one support, which looped under the tank, were fairly easily cut through (one side's biscuit strength weld to the frame parted under gravity), but the ends of the second, which ran across the tank's back, and was glassed and welded to it, were all but inaccessible. Persistence, and only one shattered cutting disc, eventually paid off . With assistance the moulding, c/w tank, was carried to join its GRP fellows tucked behind my front garden fence. The supports were then removed and the now completely skeletal rolling frame put to bed.



I think I'll now go the whole hog and take off the ally sides for my next small step.

Regards, Mick

Last edited by Mick O'Malley; 10th August 2022 at 07:27.. Reason: Typo.
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  #15  
Old 8th September 2022, 22:46
Dpaz Dpaz is offline
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Just found you. I have been away a while. It's great to see your progress. Long covid is still slowing me down. Early specials were a bit iffy, Dexion was quite useful for structural things. and domestic wire often used.
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  #16  
Old 9th September 2022, 11:51
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Mick what will you do with all the rivet holes ??
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  #17  
Old 12th September 2022, 14:31
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Default This and that...


Hi Dpaz, didn't realise you'd been laid low, best wishes for a full and speedy recovery!

Hi redratbike, when I tow the frame over to my welder for engine mountings, I'll ask him to put a blob in each side panel rivet hole as I'll be fitting new ally. I'll keep the GRP body mounting holes, drill them slightly oversize and use my lazy tongs for appropriately sized rivets.

After the Gloucester Goes Retro shenanigans, I had another camping weekend at The Overland Event near Oxford, so progress has been limited to cutting up my 1 1/2" angle for the seat belt mounting gismo and rivetting it together prior to welding - I need to do it this way as it has to fit very precisely between the frame cross members.



I got back from The Beaulieu Autojumble at about 2000 yesterday bearing my spoils, including, unusually, some car parts amongst the Biggles books and old magazines which I normally snag. I bought a pair of rear Armstrongs, new in their boxes for sixty quid, and a 3 x 2" instrument under dash mounting bracket - the twin of that I fitted to my original Phaeton (nostalgia rules!) for just three .

My internet woes were finally (hopefully) over this morning when I fitted my new fibre-friendly server, filter, and cable: it all seems lightning fast now!

Regards, Mick
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Old 21st September 2022, 09:53
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Default I love the smell of Fertan in the morning...

After nine days of displacement activity, which included buying a Mk II Cortina fuel tank (as recommended by TD-W), I yesterday opened a can of motivation and buckled down to some rear end suspension work. I gently jacked up the nearside of the frame until I judged the tension had been taken out of the spring, and set to removing the drop links. They provided nil resistance as I'd long since given all foreseeable fixings a good dousing in dismantling liquid. I drifted out the old bushes then thoroughly wire brushed the eyes and drop links and gave them a coat of Fertan. I'd always used Kurust until I learned that Classic Land Rover owners swore by the former. Nuff said!



It can immediately be seen that the front eye then provided much stiffer resistance... The eye bolt came out easily - its nut is captive to the frame - but the bush's location is masked both ends by it. OK, I'll have to axle stand either the frame or the axle and jack the other until access to the bush is achieved. However, the shock absorber scuppered this plan so I set to removing same. The top was easy but the limited bottom clearance prevented a decent swing of the hammer onto the bolt end. OK, off with the wheel, spacer, shoes etc, then the back plate and half shaft. The bottom bolt steadfastly refused to budge despite blacksmith blows from my lump hammer so I decided to cut off the shocker at its bottom neck, then disc through the bolt. Hurrah, off at last!



I then fashioned a puller from threaded rod, nuts, washers and my biggest socket, purchased forty odd years ago for Mini top swivels, which succeeded in dragging out the metal centre of the bush. By this time the cave was like an oven so I called it a day. I'm sure the other side will prove much easier with the experience gained!

Regards, Mick
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Old 22nd September 2022, 08:41
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Lightbulb Lazy people take the most pains...

With 'only' the remains of the front bush to remove, I began the day with hopes of good progress. Wrong! I decided to remove the rubber portion by drilling some big holes then levering out the remains. However the bit tore straight in and rolled itself around against the metal sleeve, tearing the rubber away in seconds. I decided to cut a slit in the sleeve with my smallest cold chisel (yet another Machine Mart purchase). Even with the spring clamped to the frame I could barely get the cut started due to its awkward location. I resorted to what I now know I should have done in the first place - remove the spring . With it lying on the concrete slab it proved simple to chop through, bend the edges and knock it out.



Neglected domestic tasks dictated a swift tidy up and a halt to proceedings.

Regards, Mick
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  #20  
Old 25th September 2022, 07:41
Mick O'Malley Mick O'Malley is offline
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Default Quick update.

After a busy Friday, I returned to the cave and tackled the remaining doable L rear suspension tasks. The jumbo socket proved the perfect drift for knocking in the front bush, and likewise my home made puller for the rear ones. I ran a die down the U bolt threads before refitting the spring to the axle. It was a bit of a fiddle as they had spread a little and needed to be compressed parallel for fitting the spring's baseplate. I used my water pump pliers in one hand whilst slipping on the baseplate with the other - fiddly but effective. Back on with the half shaft etc. and that side was done, bar the shock absorber, for whose bottom eye I'll need a new bolt.

Learning from my nearside stupidity, I jacked up the offside and whipped off the spring in no time ready for today's efforts. With impeccable timing the nice man then appeared with my Ebay purchased three point harnesses, which look absolutely mint and a snip at fifty quid the pair inc. postage. Result!



The positioning of the nuts welded on as four point top fixings is suspect, unless both he (she?) and prospective passengers were of bizarre morphology. I'll chisel or disc them off for repositioning of the two now required.

Regards, Mick
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