Are you madabout kit cars      
 "We've Got Kit Cars Covered" Information about Madabout-Kitcars.com Contact Madabout-Kitcars.com         Home of UK kit cars - madabout-kitcars.com Various kit car write ups All the latest kit car news Kit car related and general discussion

Search
Manufacturers
Kit Cars
Kit Car Data sheets
Picture Gallery
SVA Knowledgebase
Clubs & Communities
Build cost estimator
Kit cars for sale
Knowledge Base 
KitcarUSA.com
Classic-Kitcars.com
 

Go Back   Madabout Kitcars Forum > Mad Build Area > Sammio Builds and discussions

Sammio Builds and discussions Sammio bodied car builds and specials

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1461  
Old 7th December 2014, 20:09
a big scary monster a big scary monster is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 198
a big scary monster is on a distinguished road
Default

I have emailed you the link Scottie.
Reply With Quote
  #1462  
Old 9th December 2014, 16:52
Paul L's Avatar
Paul L Paul L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wembley, London
Posts: 4,919
Paul L is on a distinguished road
Default

Scottie - Given my luck, I am sure I will get caught in the rain one day, even if it is dry & sunny when I leave home.
So I plan to have a towel and some spare clothes tucked away in my boot just in case, so I need them to stay dry.

Ed - Thanks for giving Scottie the link for the LED rear reflectors.

Just incase anyone else is interested, this is the Ebay Item Number - 121440956978

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Another Blind Alley...
Just too many other things going on at the moment to get any chance to play with the car.

However, I did have a revelation that the alternative quick release pins I bought are actually a non starter.

The original locking pins have a rubber gasket under the big metal washers to provide a water tight seal.

Which is why the bolt mounting plates can be outside the rain channel.

Whereas, these alternative pins would need to be mounted inside the rain channel as they use an open/unsealed hole.

Having just changed the rain channel to accommodate Option 1, I have no intention of starting again for Option 2.

So I need to work out a way of making the original ones work and thankfully I had a couple of revelations about that too.

The locking pins themselves need to be lined up parallel to the the sides of the car when in the "open" position.

As I think this will make it easier to slot the lid into place.

The other thing I need to ensure is that all the pins are pointing "straight down" towards the bolts.

This may mean adjusting the top surface of the boot lid to remove any gentle curves under the big washers.

This is a bit like the work Swifty had to do on his boot hinges to ensure they were square.

Finger's crossed that after a bit more fine tuning, I will finally be able to call this job done.

Take care, Paul.
Reply With Quote
  #1463  
Old 9th December 2014, 19:59
a big scary monster a big scary monster is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 198
a big scary monster is on a distinguished road
Default

Hi Paul, what about these221629732290 at whichever side would be the hardest to level up, failing that these221496877222 and a bracket? Or two angled fingers that locate under the lip at the hump end , have you held a normal hinge like on a house internal door between the slit in the hump? It would be incredibly cool and add to the sophistication of your build if it where to hinge. I am still in favour of automated scissor hinge lifting the whole lid up similar to this201219653167 it would be a rite Faff but put the heater on in the summer house and work at it when everything else is frozen. A small second hand hatch back strut would easily lift the boot.If it where mine I think I would try and fabricate a hinge from thin plate cut two plates the same as the hump cuts and have it hinging a few mm above the hump I can sketch something if you are interested. All that said it's looking good you will be proudly showing your handywork to very soon. Ed.
Reply With Quote
  #1464  
Old 10th December 2014, 02:02
a big scary monster a big scary monster is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 198
a big scary monster is on a distinguished road
Default

If I may add a 1.50am can't sleep musing. What about a -----z___ type mechanism operated by the handle locating into the sides? Plonk lid on twist the handle to locate, lock it with the key. 2 external pins cockpit side or internal locating fingers.Ed.
Reply With Quote
  #1465  
Old 10th December 2014, 08:28
Paul L's Avatar
Paul L Paul L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wembley, London
Posts: 4,919
Paul L is on a distinguished road
Default

Ed - Thanks for the links, they actually reminded me that I already have a pair of these locks.



There were part of an earlier plan to fit boot hinges, that was changed to the "simpler" access panel.

At first glance, the shape of the barrel looks very similar to locking pins, so that may be another option.

With a bit of luck I will be able to get outside to do some work on the boot today.

Cheers, Paul.

PS
It's bad enough that I wake up in the middle of the night thinking about my build!
Reply With Quote
  #1466  
Old 10th December 2014, 16:21
Paul L's Avatar
Paul L Paul L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wembley, London
Posts: 4,919
Paul L is on a distinguished road
Default

A New Hope...
In my defence, I have done most of the work on the boot locking pins on my back, underneath the body shell.

Similarly, I just fitted the pins before trying to get the mounting bolts into the correct position below them.

However, as I now look at the pins, trying to work out why this approach didn't work, it is pretty obvious.

These are the top edge pins and they are clearly set at an inward angle towards each other.



Similarly, the bottom right pin points outwards instead of straight down.



Note:
The area to the left of the pin (as you look at it) is also a bit thin compared to the rest of the boot lid.

So my plan is to "square" all the locking pins up a bit by adding filler.

Although if I increase the thickness of the lid, I will need to file access slots in the corners so the pin will fit through.



So I roughly sanded the four pin locations, plus the area I want to "beef up" a bit & the tail of the passenger hump.
( As this is currently too sharp compared to the end of driver's side hump. )



For the bottom left pin, I needed to remove a small section of the lid.



As this pin needs to be dropped at the top and raised at the bottom.



After some fibreglass filler had been added, the lid looked like this.



I re-fitted the lid to the body shell and tried to use the big washer to set the filler in the right position.

This was not a very good idea as the filler stuck to the protective film on the washers and made a right mess of everything.
( I've already scraped off most of the filler by the time I took the photo. )



So I had to smooth out the filler as best I could and clean up all the washers before the filler set.



Then I carried the boot lid through the house so I could leave it in the weak winter sunshine on the patio.



At least this is marginally warmer than the driveway which now stays in shadow all day.

When that had set enough, I roughly sanded it into shape.



It had quickly become clear that by trying hard not to "over do" the filler, I hadn't quite added enough in some places.

I also found the easiest way to fit the locking pins was to simply file a slot in both the top & bottom edges like so.





Then I relocated back to the patio to added some normal body filler.



If anything, I probably added a bit too much filler this time.

End of Part 1...
Reply With Quote
  #1467  
Old 10th December 2014, 16:22
Paul L's Avatar
Paul L Paul L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wembley, London
Posts: 4,919
Paul L is on a distinguished road
Default

Part 2:
After another round of sanding, the lid was looking like this.





Note:
The rubber seal is not in place, as it was removed so I could spray some etch primer on the other day.

Unfortunately the light was fading fast at this point and all my attempts to photo the pins themselves failed.

Still, the good news is that the pins are much straighter than they were & a bit more sanding should help.

Then I can start work on getting the inside edges of the lid around the pins to match the top edge profiles.

After that I will see if I can get the locking bolts into a suitable position for all four bolts to work.

Also the "softening" of the end of the passenger hump's tail seems to be working out OK too.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Alternative Locks:
I had a play with these this morning & they are the same size as the locking pins, so I could re-use the existing holes.



However, there isn't enough room for the latch to turn 180 degrees if I set them up here on the top edge.



Although it does look like I could get the 180 degree sweep I need if they were set up like this.



So just in case the filler work I've been doing doesn't solve the problem, I could have a Plan B.

Until next time, take care, Paul.
Reply With Quote
  #1468  
Old 11th December 2014, 15:53
Paul L's Avatar
Paul L Paul L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wembley, London
Posts: 4,919
Paul L is on a distinguished road
Default

A Tactical Withdrawal...
Stepped outside this morning and was just about to peel off the covers when it started to rail.

So it was the afternoon before I could finally continue with the sanding down of the new locking pin "mounds".

Although it doesn't look like it in this first photo, the top edge pins are now vaguely straight.



A photo taken "head on" shows the angles a bit better.



Note: I still have to work on the inside edges of the boot lid.

And these are the bottom edge pins.





So far, so good.

Then I removed the pins and re-marked the bolt plates.



Thankfully all the original holes were pretty much in the right place, so I was just removing the excess filler from the other day.

I then spend a long time crawling back and forth under the car to see if I could get the bolts set up properly.

I did some fine tuning to the angles of the bolt holes which helped a bit.

But it now seems that the rubber seal is still sitting a little too proud.

I managed to set the bolts in the "locked" position and tighten them so the lid was pulled down flush(ish) with the body shell.



But at this point, there was so much pressure on the locks, I could only undo 1 out of 4, for fear of breaking the key.

So I need to trim a little bit more off the rain channel so I can finally see if these pins will actually work.

However, to be brutally honest, I am seriously fed up with working on this part of the build, as it is doing my head in.

So, as per today's title, I am making a tactical withdrawal and simply walking away from the boot lid for a while.
( Although I will loosen the bolts tomorrow if I get the chance. )

Obviously I will come back to this and finish it off, one way, or the other, at some point, but for now I need a break away from it.

To end on a slightly more upbeat note, while crawling around under the body shell I finally remembered to take a photo of the drain hole.



I just need to give this a final skim of normal body filler and then it will be ready to connect the drain tube to.

Until next time, take care, Paul.
Reply With Quote
  #1469  
Old 13th December 2014, 09:31
Scottie22 Scottie22 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 2,161
Scottie22 is on a distinguished road
Default

I felt a bit like that about making my windscreen Paul, I think some times its possible to work yourself so hard at one thing you become
"stale" and really have to have a break to re-group and approach the job with new enthusiasm.

You will fell much fresher after a break!
Reply With Quote
  #1470  
Old 13th December 2014, 14:16
Nike55 Nike55 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 490
Nike55 is on a distinguished road
Default

Definitely agree with Scottie22, you sometimes have to walk away from a problem, do something else then come back to it after a few days (or in my case 2 years!).
Reply With Quote
  #1471  
Old 13th December 2014, 15:58
Paul L's Avatar
Paul L Paul L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wembley, London
Posts: 4,919
Paul L is on a distinguished road
Default

Scottie & Nigel - Cheers chaps.
Even though I have opened an even bigger can of worms today, the change has done me good.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Frosty The Sammio Builder...
With high winds forecast the other night, I had put some wood on top of the car cover.

The fact the wood was still covered in frost when I started this morning was not a good sign.



Without the body shell in place, water finds it way past the sides of the covers & into the lowered floor pan.



Thankfully the it wasn't cold enough to freeze the water, but my hands still felt it when I was mopping this out.

My wife helped me move the body shell back onto the framework and this exposed a bit of a mess.



Cleaning the drive is on my "Pre Christmas Chores" list, so that was the first thing I did.



I had a very brief glance at the bolts for the boot access panel.



One thing is clear, I need to set everything up based on the angles when the body shell is in position.
( As I am not getting the true picture when the body shell is off the framework. )

But that is a problem for another day, so I switched my attention to the bonnet.

The first thing I needed to do was to stop the low points of the bonnet hitting the scuttle before the corners.





So I marked up a series of slits on both sides and cut them with my angle grinder.



Note:
Eventually these slits will be extended to the faint black line you can see further down the bonnet.
( Which should give me the space required to blend the old & new curves together. )

Despite the slits, I still couldn't get the bonnet to sit neatly on the passenger side.



This was because the bottom edge was too long.



After trimming the bottom edge, it was then the angle of rear bonnet edge that wasn't right.



So that was trimmed and I could now clamp the bonnet into position on this side.



There isn't enough space on my drive to get a full "side on" photo, so this is the best I could do.





I am really happy that it looks like I might be able to make a good join of the old bonnet & new scuttle.

Although the less said about the work required to re-shape the wheel arch the better.



End of Part 1...
Reply With Quote
  #1472  
Old 13th December 2014, 16:01
Paul L's Avatar
Paul L Paul L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wembley, London
Posts: 4,919
Paul L is on a distinguished road
Default

Part 2:
I also need to make a final decision about whether to attach the bottom of the bonnet to the sides of the body shell.

If I do, then this section of my Spitfire bulkhead will provide the level for the join.



In addition, I need to square the front edge of the bonnet lip on the body shell to match the cockpit edge of the scuttle.



Over to the driver's side of the bonnet, where the biggest problem is still the fact the wheel is exposed.



If anything, the driver's side appears to "tilt" inwards.



Although it is not easy to see in this photo, but with the passenger side in position, the driver's side comes up a little "short".



I knew what Mac did to fix this bonnet problems so I got my marker pen out.



Then after taking a deep breath, I channelled my inner Frankenstein...



And made the cut...



Although I'm blaming the cold weather for the slight wobble in my cutting.

Again, the bottom of the bonnet needed to be trimmed on this side to bring the top corner into line.







In order to start putting all of this back together, I will need to temporarily screw the bonnet to the body shell in places.

As I couldn't even clamp the main section into position properly.



However, at this point, my wife and children were returning from their Christmas shopping & my time outside was at an end.

So for now I've had to leave the bonnet in a bit of a mess.



But past experience has shown me that this can be re-built (eventually).

I will also have to flatten the central bonnet bulge as part of these bonnet modifications.







I have been dreading sorting this mess out, but now I have made a start, I will try to get on with it.

Until next time, take care, Paul.

PS
As part of my Christmas cleaning, I started on the front windows too.

To my horror, something I thought was dirt, turns out to be old metal angle grinder sparks burnt into the glass.



Any suggestions on how to clean this before my wife spots it would be most welcome.
Reply With Quote
  #1473  
Old 14th December 2014, 16:10
Paul L's Avatar
Paul L Paul L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wembley, London
Posts: 4,919
Paul L is on a distinguished road
Default

Small Beginnings...
Had to ferry one of my daughters to a birthday party first thing this morning and it was COLD outside.



Thankfully by the time I'd finished my other chores it had warmed up a bit.

I marked the bonnet lip at a one inch gap from the tape measure (which is parallel to the dash).



Then I ran into a small stock control problem when I couldn't find the "spare" tub of fibreglass filler in the shed.

Whilst I did buy two tubs last time, it turns out I am already at the bottom of the 2nd tub.
( I've now ordered two more tubs. )

Still, at least there was just enough to make a start on the scuttle.





This will provide a good enough base for me to add a layer of normal filler over the top.

I will also trim the bottom edge of the bonnet lip next time I have the body shell off the frame.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Question:
Is there anything I should be aware of concerning the angles of the bonnet lip on the body shell?
As I am beginning to worry that the bonnet make catch the body work when it opens if I make a mistake.
Or does the way the bonnet opens always clear the body shell?

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

I had closer look at my factory hinge points and it turns out the driver's side was set at a slight angle.

These are not great photos as the grey primer and a dull day do not make a great combination.

Passenger Side:





Driver's Side:





So I might need to straighten that side out in some way.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Next I went to play with my flat steel bar and cut off couple of lengths.



I want to see if I can make a scissor hinge similar to Mister Towed's for my bonnet.

So in the next photo, the card pointing "up" would be attached to the chassis.
And the lengths pointing "out" and "down" would be attached to the hinge points above.



Note:
At this point I have made the lengths oversize, so I can trim them down to shape later.

So I cleaned up the edges and used the rest of the bar to keep the clamped sections "flat"



It has been a while since I did any welding, but thankfully I make a good join.



Although that was as much as I managed to do today as I now back on taxi service duty.

Until next time, take care, Paul.
Reply With Quote
  #1474  
Old 14th December 2014, 16:57
a big scary monster a big scary monster is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 198
a big scary monster is on a distinguished road
Default

Hi Paul I used a Stanley knife blade to knock the tops off weld splatter on a windscreen then buffed it with cutting compound and electronic sponge mop.you may be able to disguise it plus It will look better if its not rusty. Ed.
Reply With Quote
  #1475  
Old 14th December 2014, 21:29
swifty's Avatar
swifty swifty is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 835
swifty is on a distinguished road
Default

Neat welding paul, it did look cold at your this morning with the frost on the cars, we had a fairly reasonable day today which makes a change.

Sorry i can't help with the grinding splatter, i hope you mange to disguise it.

Keep up the progress Paul.
Reply With Quote
  #1476  
Old 15th December 2014, 08:49
garyh garyh is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: birchington, kent
Posts: 1,766
garyh is on a distinguished road
Default

How about fridge magnets? Or just replace the glass units... Merry Christmas.
Reply With Quote
  #1477  
Old 15th December 2014, 08:56
Viatron Viatron is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,161
Viatron is on a distinguished road
Default

Paul, the bad news is I think the only 100% solution to the window will be replacement, you could try an aggressive cutting compound first as I don't think you have anything to loose.

Well done on taking the plunge on the bonnet, its really the only way to resolve it that I was happy with. On the central bonnet bulge are you sure you'll have enough clearance if you remove it? If you do I would concentrate on getting the now removed wing portion put back in place then consider totally cutting out the bulge and replacing it with a flat sheet thin enough to take on the curve you require.

Keep up the good work

Mac
Reply With Quote
  #1478  
Old 15th December 2014, 15:15
Scottie22 Scottie22 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 2,161
Scottie22 is on a distinguished road
Default

Hi Paul, I agree with Mac when glass is damaged in that way, its finished. It can be cleaned up a bit, but replacement is the only way.
Welcome to the club!
Reply With Quote
  #1479  
Old 15th December 2014, 17:08
Paul L's Avatar
Paul L Paul L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wembley, London
Posts: 4,919
Paul L is on a distinguished road
Default

Ed, Swifty, Gary, Mac & Scottie - Thanks for all the replies gentlemen.

House Windows - I think I will wait until I have finished the build before sorting them out.
Unfortunately, the ones with the most damage were only fitted in 2009 when the garage was converted.

Welding - I must confess it is good to be making something for a change, rather that butchering fibreglass.

Bonnet Bulge - Just to be clear, I am only looking to flatten the bulge at the back of the bonnet so it matches the scuttle profile.
This only needs to happen at the rear of the bonnet and the main shape between the wheel arches will remain.

I took this photo this morning, it is not great, but you should get the idea.



The Spitfire bulkhead is original height, so everything in the engine bay sits lower than that.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

If you build it, hinging will come...
I had two thoughts about Mister Towed's scissor hinge design...

The first was that this was his second attempt at making some bonnet hinges that would work.
( And similarly Mac needed more than one attempt to build his hinges too. )

The second was how to make space for the scissor hinge below the chassis line so the section of bonnet below the grille opening wouldn't foul them.
I thought that simply cutting slits out would look terrible, but an "upside down" bonnet bulge would work.
At this stage I don't know if I will need anything, but at least I know that it shouldn't be a problem if I do.
This still might look at bit odd, but then again, quite a bit of my build will not survive close inspection.

Anyway, all this means that I have stopped trying to work out a perfect hinge arrangement in advance.

Instead, I will simply build a MkI version and see how I get on, then adjust and build a MkII version if necessary.

This approach is a big help, as I can't really sort out the bonnet, until I have working hinges.

As the hinges will determine the angle at which the bonnet will meet the lip on the body shell.

So once that is established, I can then adjust everything else to line up properly (touch wood).

I found the cardboard template for the grille and gave it a light trim for a slightly better fit.



This made it easier for me to mark up a centre line between the two factory fitted hinges.

I also taped some parking cardboard to the radiator cap, to ensure I maintained enough clearance.



It was a bit of a challenge to get the main section of the bonnet into the right position.





But that roughly lines up the bonnet with the centre point of the chassis.

This will be my MkI hinge design.



So I trimmed a bit off the "L" shape I made yesterday.



I am going to use the two thin off cuts as locating "lugs" (more on that later).

I then cut a matching set of pieces for the other hinge.



Next I had to use some spare lengths of the flat bar to allow me to clamp the lugs into position.



Once welded and tidied up they now look like this.



I plan to simply bolt the "L" plate to the factory brackets, which will sit inside these lugs.

After welding the other pieces together, I now had the two "bonnet sides" of the scissor hinge.



The "chassis side" of the hinges will be a simple length of flat bar.

However, I may need to cut them at a slight angle before attaching them to the chassis.

The only other thing I managed to do today was to get some normal body filler on the scuttle.





Before I packed up for the night I gave that an initial sanding down along the top edge.



I plan to re-draw a line for the vertical face, slightly closer than the guide line I used for the fibreglass filler.

This should hopefully give me a nice straight face.

Until next time, take care, Paul.
Reply With Quote
  #1480  
Old 17th December 2014, 14:32
Paul L's Avatar
Paul L Paul L is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wembley, London
Posts: 4,919
Paul L is on a distinguished road
Default

Winter Cleaning...
Once again, my usual rush to put things away has left the Summer House in such a mess I could barely get into it.

This time it was even worse than usual as the "bottom" had fallen out of a couple of my storage boxes while looking for things the other day.

So I bought a batch of new boxes and decided to sort everything out properly for a change.

Before:
( Not a great photo as it was taken from the outside looking in. )



During:



After:





Having all the boxes the same size has made a big difference as they are a much better fit on the shelves.

In addition, I have numbered the boxes and made a separate list of the contents of each box.

Whereas, previously, I had listed the contents on a piece of paper & stuck that to the box.

Given some boxes were "hidden" behind others, this meant pulling lots of boxes out trying to locate the right one.

I have also separately packed up two boxes of surplus parts that I still need to sell on Ebay.

My surplus parts includes these bonnet mascots that I've picked up along the way since my build started.



I actually have a 4th mascot that I am still in two minds about fitting.

Note: The one on the bottom right of the photo is still my favourite, but it is MASSIVE!

Not surprisingly this tidy up has taken a lot of time over the last two days, but it was well worth the effort.

Unfortunately, it is currently too misty outside to work on the bonnet hinges.

However, at least I was able to find a selection of nuts & bolts to use with the hinges.

So until next time, take care, Paul.

PS
Still no sign of my revised V5C (Take 2) from the DVLA.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +0. The time now is 15:53.

copyright madabout-kitcars.com 2000-2020
terms and conditions | privacy policy