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Go Back   Madabout Kitcars Forum > Mad Build Area > Vintage and Classic Roadster Kit Car Builds

Vintage and Classic Roadster Kit Car Builds For Vintage and Classic era kit cars. Post your build reports, problems and progress here

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  #81  
Old 13th October 2021, 17:06
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MartinClan MartinClan is offline
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Couldn't resist trying a splined hub and wire wheel. The hubs were intended for one of the small Triumphs, but as these share a lot of parts with the Marina I gambled they would fit.
They look awfully wide until you fit a wheel at which point - they look perfect IMHO...
Cheers, Robin
splined_hub by Robin Martin, on Flickr
wire_wheel by Robin Martin, on Flickr
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  #82  
Old 13th October 2021, 17:39
molleur molleur is offline
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Looks good!
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  #83  
Old 14th October 2021, 14:14
jonkoxe jonkoxe is offline
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Hi Robin
I love the look of wires on the Roadster.
When I originally built my roadster back in 1986 I fitted adaptors and wires like you.
WARNING: Make sure the wire wheel seats correctly onto the tapered part of the adapter. I had loads of problems with mine until I realised the wheels were seating onto the top of the wheel studs. After grinding them back flush with the wheel nuts I managed to get them to work correctly. Hope this makes sense.
Jon
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  #84  
Old 14th October 2021, 16:37
Lucky@LeMans Lucky@LeMans is offline
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Good tip ! I usually put a blob of paint onto each wheel stud and fit the wheel. Remove it again and check for paint on the back of the wheel.
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  #85  
Old 21st October 2021, 12:13
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MartinClan MartinClan is offline
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Thanks for the comments and tips. STILL waiting for my Ikea kitchen so progress continues. After a lot of delays the zintec steel for my front and rear bulkheads arrived. I am making them from steel as opposed to the original alluminium for strength. The front bulkhead tends to crack arround the pedal box and the rear bulkhead has the seatbelts mounted to it. I was able to use my newly beefed up bender for the first time. As expected the folds are fairly soft but fine for the purpose.

on_a_bender by Robin Martin, on Flickr

rear_bulkhead2 by Robin Martin, on Flickr

It fits considerably better than the original factory made effort - even if I do say so myself!

Cheers, Robin
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  #86  
Old 21st October 2021, 12:46
molleur molleur is offline
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nice work!
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  #87  
Old 21st October 2021, 15:07
AlanHogg AlanHogg is offline
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Very neat job !
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  #88  
Old 3rd November 2021, 09:36
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Default Heater Options

I am currently re-making the front bulkhead of DRL152K and, as that is where it may be mounted, I am thinking about heater options. I wondered what others have done and I have a few questions.

Is it worth the effort fitting windscreen demisters? I will only very occasionally be using a hood.
Is it worth trying to get fresh air in, or is a simple recirculating heater the better (and simpler!) option.
And where is the best place to mount the heater? I was going to put it on top the bulkhead, as per the manual, but if I use one of the smaller aftermarket jobbies (T7 design is favourite) it's probably small enough to sit under the dashboard on top of the transmission tunnel.

Cheers, Robin
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  #89  
Old 3rd November 2021, 10:37
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Mister Towed Mister Towed is offline
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I had one of these in my Spyder -

https://www.t7design.co.uk/2-2kw-mic...9-cc4-d35.html

It never really put much heat out, I'm afraid, even taking into account that it was in a completely open car. I've gone for a much bigger heater matrix from a production car (VW Corrado) with a surface mount fan for my latest project, which is also going to be completely open.

As for fresh air inlet and demisting, the two really go hand in hand and I'd say they will be essential for safety reasons if you get caught in a downpour with the hood up.
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  #90  
Old 18th November 2021, 18:20
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I have made some good progress on replacing the front bulkhead. The original was rather tired and had a scary crack from pressure from the pedal box.
cracked by Robin Martin, on Flickr
I have made the replacement in steel, the same as the rear bulkhead. Proved to be quite tricky getting it right particularly at the bottom arround the chassis members. I have a couple of closing plates to still to fit there.
The pedal box is also trial fitted. I have made a L & H shaped reinforcement from 25mm angle to help spread the load. The clutch pedal needs a little adjustment using the blowtorch and hammer it seems.
The observant might notice there are 2 rows of fixings at the top rear of the bulkhead. The original design used the same fixings both to fix the scuttle (dashboard) moulding and secure the bulkhead to a chassis crossmember. I decided to make those seperate thereby improving the strength. I know the fixings are stainless, generally frowned upon for anything structural, but there are enough of them to well distribute any loads. On the final assembly I will also bond the bulkhead using a Sikaflex adhesive - same as I did on the Pembleton.
front_bulkhead1 by Robin Martin, on Flickr
front_bulkhead2 by Robin Martin, on Flickr

Next job: overhaul the steering rack and decide on the position for the steering column. I want it under, rather than through, the dash as in the original design. The orginal Marina steering column is pretty shot so I am thinking of using one from a Triumph Spitfire for which you can still get things like bushes.

Cheers for now, Robin
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  #91  
Old 19th November 2021, 09:12
oxford1360 oxford1360 is offline
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Very neat, and it will bring greater peace of mind.

It inspires me to get back to my project.
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  #92  
Old 19th November 2021, 10:57
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Nice work Robin, as expected
Perhaps you should make a few more for other Marlin restorers?
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  #93  
Old 20th November 2021, 09:37
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Awesome work Robin
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  #94  
Old 12th December 2021, 16:23
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I have almost (see below) completed the revised steering column arrangement. The column now exits at the bottom of the dash, instead of through it, and the steering wheel is angled at about the same inclination as the dash, instead of being almost vertical.

The arrangement under the bonnet loooks a bit odd due to the fact that the steering rack is mounted so high in the Marina. But it gives me a nice angle between the lower and upper steering column which the SVA people would be delighted with. The idea is, in a front end crash, the upper steering column is not directed straight into the drivers chest! It should also miss all the engine ancilliaries, fingers crossed.
steering_shaft by Robin Martin, on Flickr

From the bulkhead backwards the steering column is mounted on some sturdy, and adjustable, brackets. I made the steering column itself using some Triumph bushes and an alluminium tube. And, yes, the brackets do use exhaust clamps, but after a lot of thinking they seemed the easiest and sturdiest way of mounting.
steering_column3 by Robin Martin, on Flickr
steering_column1 by Robin Martin, on Flickr

I said almost completed.... I was very satisfied with the result until I offered up the pedal box and, despite carefull measuring, found the lower support bracket fouled the brake pedal. Grrrr - the air was a bit blue. Anyway, after sleeping on it I have come up with a slightly different bracket which should be fine. I'll post a picture when I have fabricated it. Which could be some time as my Ikea kitchen is due to arrive Tuesday. I have told the wife it's her Christmas present ;-)

Cheers, Robin
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  #95  
Old 4th January 2022, 19:03
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I have made a little progress inbetween kitchen fitting. I have remade the lower steering column mount so it now clears the pedals. While I was at it I bent the clutch pedal so it is now a more sensible distance from the brake pedal. (Perhaps the original builder had big feet!)
steering_column5 by Robin Martin, on Flickr
And it was pointed out to me that the angle that the steering UJ was running at seemed to exceed the 35deg recommended max. They were right! I have jiggled things a bit, mainly rotating the steering rack, and now the UJ is working within the 35deg. I could probably reduce the angle even further but I thought I would wait until a trial fit of the engine just in case I have to do any more rethinking of the steering shaft.
revised_steering_shaft by Robin Martin, on Flickr
Now back to the kitchen fitting.... It's too cold in the man shed anyway :-)
Cheers, Robin
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  #96  
Old 5th January 2022, 17:42
Mitchelkitman Mitchelkitman is offline
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I hope you won't mind me saying..... I may be wrong, but I think it's the "correct way" for the Uj's on the shaft to be 'in-phase' ie, lined up so they are a mirror image so that when the shaft turns it effectively stays the same length if that makes sense. If out of phase the shaft won't stay straight as it revolves? Obviously more important for a fast-moving item such as a prop shaft, but still probably improves things even for a steering column?
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  #97  
Old 5th January 2022, 17:44
Mitchelkitman Mitchelkitman is offline
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p.s I've just looked back at the photos and in the first one the alignment looks correct, in the latest one it maybe isn't?
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  #98  
Old 6th January 2022, 08:27
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MartinClan MartinClan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitchelkitman View Post
I hope you won't mind me saying..... I may be wrong, but I think it's the "correct way" for the Uj's on the shaft to be 'in-phase' ie, lined up so they are a mirror image so that when the shaft turns it effectively stays the same length if that makes sense. If out of phase the shaft won't stay straight as it revolves? Obviously more important for a fast-moving item such as a prop shaft, but still probably improves things even for a steering column?
Took me a few minutes but I see what you mean. As far as I am aware it doesn't really apply to steering shafts. But I will do some Googling to check.
The problem with the first arrangement is that the UJ at the steering wheel end (the shiney new one) was running at about 38deg. According to the manufacturer (and some other wise sages :-) ) the maximum angle is 35deg otherwise you are in danger of wearing it out quickly and/or, in extreme cases, locking it up.

Cheers, Robin
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  #99  
Old 6th January 2022, 08:59
Mitchelkitman Mitchelkitman is offline
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Not as easy to describe as seeing a picture - a picture paint a thousand words as they say. Yes the 'lobes' need to be in line end -to-end. I'd suspect running it out of phase is more likely to wear it though and the steering may feel jerky?

Last edited by Mitchelkitman; 6th January 2022 at 09:02..
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  #100  
Old 18th February 2022, 11:25
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Default Scuttle Top

After a great deal of fitting and re-fitting I finally have the scuttle top fixed in place. It needed a lot of fettling to get it to fit and even now, if I was to be critical, its a little too narrow - it could do with being about 4mm wider.
scuttle_top1 by Robin Martin, on Flickr
The front lip, which fixes to the bulkhead also is not flat and had to be pulled into place. I will have to bed it into some sealant when I finally fix it.
scuttle_top2 by Robin Martin, on Flickr
I have also bonded in a couple of plenums so I can have windscreen demisters. I have drilled a series of holes in the scuttle top rather than cutting a slot. You can just see them in the first picture with a rather flimsy aluminium surround purchased from the well know kit car bits place, as were the plenums.
demister by Robin Martin, on Flickr

Kitchen now almost complete so I hope progress to be a bit faster. One can always hope...

Cheers, Robin
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